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Roger

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 #1 


Presented by Arno Galmarini from Elite Training
Roger

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 #2 
There were a few questions that we didn't have time to get to in the webinar.

1) I was just wondering if you could expand on the issue of having a respiratory limitation, would you see any signs other than poor recovery- for instance might you see a progressive drop in arterial O2 sat between the intervals or anything like this?

2) Do you do limit training "IF" SMO2 is LOW?

3) What was the power testing device ? Quantum...

4) What about the supply limitation training and tHb curve? Wouldn't be also great to control intervals via increasing thb curve and heart rate, which could be also the aim of this training?
arnogalmi

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 #3 
Thanks for the questions. So here are the answers:

1. What you would need to see is delayed recovery in the SMo2 curve. A progressive drop between the intervals (a deeper desaturation in the O2 curve than the bout before) is usually not the case but it can be that during recovery of the O2 curve there can be a dip in the curve which could be a hint of a respiratory limitation. Usually this worsen as the interval bouts are progressing, in other words, it gets worse over time. BUT this doesn't necessarily mean there is a respiratory limitation. You always have to back it up with further tests such as a spirometry test or sometimes just by asking the athlete if they have a history of asthma or something equal.

2. I'm sorry I don't understand this question. If you could elaborate on that I could give an answer.

3. the 1080 Motion Quantum: https://1080motion.com/products/1080-quantum-syncro/

4. Honestly we don't look to much into tHb curve during training as this gets confusing sometimes. When we do test we do look into tHb sometimes to get a clearer picture of the limitation. But it could be an interesting thought to look at thb curve as well, since you want to generate more blood flow to the muscles during supply limitation training as the end goal. But smo2 works great so often there is nod need to look at thb during training, especially from a practical standpoint.
bobbyjobling

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 #4 
Hi, thanks for the webinar.
My question:
When you train an athlete with a supply problem do you manage to "change" the limiter to utilisation ? Or do they always have a supply problem even when the performance has improved.

Do all athletes eventually have a supply problem?
arnogalmi

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 #5 
Thanks for the question.

Almost never to be honest, unless the athlete is coming back from an injury. This would mean that the athlete either got weaker in the muscles or he changed the exercise and lacks the skill for it. But at the end supply is what you always want to have more of. For example world class cyclists almost all have just supply limitation because they are so well trained in the muscles that what they need is more blood flow to it. The reverse (transition from utilization to supply) is definitely happening more often.
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