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jschiltz

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Posts: 49
 #1 
Hello All - hope everyone is having a good summer so far for those in the northern hemisphere

A question that has been on my mind lately - how can you use NIRS to determine when you should change your training to focus more on utilization or strength training?

Example - you start out and do an assessment, you find that your training would be best served by focusing on your efficiency - things like respiratory training, building stroke volume, capillary density, etc......  doing this of course increases your ability to generate power, and you see your "zones" move to the right... meaning higher power at the same metabolic/physiological cost.

But at a certain point those gains become very small, lots of additional hours may or may not lead to additional gains - basically you have maxed out the efficiency of the muscle mass you have with the training time you have available.

Now - i realize that additional muscle mass, and then subsequent training of that mass may lead to a situation where your current respiratory or circulatory system can not support it, but in events with short, hard efforts where the deoxygenation always is way ahead of the rise in HR.... this might not be as much of an issue.

Has anyone made this decision recently? and what kind of NIRS indicators did they use to make that decision?
Kirill

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Posts: 94
 #2 

I believe that if the muscle cells become hypertrophic, less and less of them are recruited on old loads and fewer and fewer active cells in the sensor's sensation zone.

An obvious consequence is the shift of the oxygenation curve to the right.

I did 2 months of squat and my 5 second maximum UP from about 680 watts to ~ 980. I do not consider this level sufficient, it is necessary at least 1000 watts for 15 seconds, and 5 seconds to raise up to 1400-1600 watts. Although for the final acceleration it is possible to hypertrophy the thigh even more.

The criterion for the termination of strength training is 0% oxygen in the quadriceps at the heart rate of 190 during the tests, even 1 minute retention or wingate will go.

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Kirill

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Posts: 94
 #3 
Chris Frum is a perfect example of ineffective training - if you look at his heart rate in step tests and competitions, and extrapolate to an average of 190, he should spin 800 watts. But his trainer does not know how to deal with strength training (muscle hypertrophy), and for some reason can not raise the anaerobic threshold to the limit of his current muscle mass (480-500 watts can not be done). As a result, he uses only 50% of the oxygen capacity of the transport system and 70-80% current muscle. If he lifted his 5 second sprint to 2000 watts, he made more massive thighs, it would be much more interesting to see the levels of VO2 above 120+ ml / kg / min.




Kirill

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 #4 
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