Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
Registered:
Posts: 1,530
 #16 
wowww incredible great  thinking  and I have fun to see the " virus" of  what  NIRS  can show  is  moving into the coaching and athletes  field  so nicely.
 Here  my   fist  critical thought   in your case.
 1. It is one test only.
 So  I  would have a problem  to  do too much interpretation  on what may  be limiter and or compensator.
 As  explained before the rowing is  very complex  and  a shift    form  upper  and body involvement   during  the same  load  can change  many  reactions.
 Here  what I would do.
 A  daily   rowing workout  and the workout is   simply a 5/1/5  workout   till to the " failure  followed by a specific  intensity  or load you like to stay after the full 5/1/5   for a  certain time  or any other workout.
 So basically your " warm up " is a 5/1/5   every time you do a workout.
 If you have the peripedal program you can  than  save it  and  than we can c get a CVS file out of it (here's how) and overlap them    and we can see, what was just  a   one time   reaction and what is a consistence  appearance  and therefor  worth while to do a closer investigation to get a proper idea on Limiter and compensator.
 Hope this makes  sense.  see  idea of HRV  and other ideas.  Cheers Juerg
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #17 
I've attached below a 5/1/5 assessment I did on the rowing machine after a month of training. I figured I'd talk about the training interventions I've undertaken the last little while and the changes I think have occurred as a result. I also think I have a much better handle on the limiter and compensator.

So below is the THb and SmO2 data overlayed. Again steps were done in 50 watt increments and the test was started at 50 watts. Next time I do one of these I think I'll start at 100 watts. Much like last tests there is an overall decrease in my THb levels throughout the test.
 Screen Shot 2013-12-02 at 8.45.37 PM.png 
In terms of training interventions, since I performed the first 5/1/5 at the beginning of November I've done a lot of lower intensity work on the ergometer, staying in the STEI or FEI intensities identified in the first assessments. In addition I've also been using my Spirotiger in sessions between 30 minutes and an hour at low breathing rates attempting to strengthen my diaphragm and improve the coordination of the muscle. Just in terms of perceived effort during this test, up to 150 watts was very easy and breathing felt strong and co-ordinated. At 200 watts breathing became more difficult and at 250 watts, breathing was noticeably shallower and more rapid. I didn't really notice any discomfort elsewhere in the body, I certainly could have pushed harder with the legs, and my heart rate wasn't at my maximum. 

My current hunch is that my limiter in terms of rowing performance is my diaphragm and general core strength. I'm working off the perceived exertion I feel during a workout and the changes I see in THb.There's no increase throughout the test like one sees in the other examples posted here and a possibility is improper breathing caused by a weak or not properly coordinated diaphragm. I should note however that in many of the steps, unlike in previous 5/1/5 assessments I've done there is no an increase in the THb level during 5 minute step, even if there is an overall slight decrease from the beginning to the end of the assessment in THb levels. I'm not sure if this supports or conflicts with my theory regarding my diaphragm. 


 
Attached Files
csv Dec_2_IPAHD.csv (48.89 KB, 22 views)

Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #18 
I've included my latest assessment here. The basics for the test are as follows. First load was 75 watts, and incremented at 50 watts for each step. Steps were done up until the second step at 225 watts where a continual decrease in SmO2 was noted and the assessment was halted. It was done on a concept 2 ergometer and followed the 5/1/5 step pattern. With regards to training over the christmas break, it was a little interrupted with family and the holiday so I wasn't expecting any miracles. In terms of changes from the last test the first thing I note is the way the THb value didn't decrease over the course of this assessment in the way it has in prior assessments. My last assessment from December shows a steady and continual decline in the THb value during the load phase. While the overall decrease is slight in the December assessment the decline does not change overall during the test. In this case THb increases during a number of steps in the assessment and finally stabilizes. Presumably this is a positive change as the body is able to supply more blood to areas in need of it. I don't have a second moxy to confirm this but I have a suspicion that its due to a change in in my core and or breathing. The two are obviously linked (diaphragm used for both core and breathing) and while I'm not sure if the change in THb is due to a reduction in vasoconstriction thanks to improved breathing or that a weak core area is using less bloodflow to supply itself I feel that distinction is a little arbitrary. Likely if my suspicions are correct its a bit of both.
Screen Shot 2014-01-06 at 9.20.52 PM.png

 
Attached Files
csv jan_7th_515.csv (41.32 KB, 20 views)

Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
Registered:
Posts: 1,530
 #19 
Can  you send the original CSV  as  this one  seems corrupted  when I tried  to download. Thanks.
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #20 
Sure thing Juerg, I'll send it later this afternoon when I'm home from work.
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #21 
Hi All,

Its been awhile since I've uploaded one of these assessments. I was sick for most of February and was really only able to train well from March onwards. This step test went better than the last one in terms of the effort involved and the way it felt. The steps began at 50 watts and incremented in 50 watts. The very last step was the second one at 250 watts, at the time I'd stopped as I'd seen a continual decrease but in looking at the data now I wonder if I should have kept going. At the very least I think next time I can begin at 100 watts as my SmO2 levels were still increasing there. Anyways, in terms of training adaptions I've been doing a lot of long slow steady stuff and have started to focus more on core work and integrating some spirotiger work. My core is quite weak at the moment. I'll update this post tomorrow with some more thoughts about the actual data itself.

Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 7.17.59 PM.png

Marcel

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 54
 #22 
Hi, is red tHB and blue SmO2? I assume this was a test for rowing and Moxy mount on tricep? There is a huge jump in tHb (red) after your last effort. Did you relax differently during that pause to the other 1min pauses?
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #23 
Hi Marcel,

I see I neglected to include the legend in the screenshot I uploaded, sorry about that! Yes red is tHb and blue is SmO2. As far as location the moxy was placed on the left leg on the vastus lateralis. With regards to the change in tHb levels after the first step at 250 watts, I'm not too sure why that occurred. Each minute rest phase involved just sitting on the machine doing nothing, I didn't change that in between the efforts at 250 watts.
Marcel

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 54
 #24 
Just out of interest if you are doing rowing assessments. Have you tried to do a assessment with the moxy placed on the arm to compare the results to the legs.  
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #25 
Hi Marcel,

I haven't tried any on the arm as of yet. The plan this summer is to pick up another Moxy as I'd like to run one on the leg and the second on the arm, core or intercostal breathing muscles. I suppose in the meantime I could simply put it on the arm instead of the leg but I haven't gotten around to it yet.
Marcel

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 54
 #26 
I think it could be really interesting to look at the two. I realise you push a lot with your legs and tend to use your back more during rowing but there is more arm involvement during rowing than legs... unless I am doing it wrong on the rower! Its just a bit fiddly trying to tape the device to your arm on your own. Make sure its on the lateral part of the tricep otherwise it tends to rub on the side of your chest if on the inner side.
Nkrause

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 49
 #27 
Hi Marcel,

Actually in the rowing stroke, the legs and trunk section of the body account for a little more than 3/4 of the total power produced. The legs contribute about 50% and the trunk a third, the remaining amount is provided by the arms. The article I've linked to above cites an article by Valery Kleshnev who has written a lot on the biomechanics of rowing. In fact there have been some highly successful crews, notably the Dutch 8 in 1996 that won gold, that have done so by focusing almost exclusively on ensuring the legs were working hard and deemphasizing the finish of the stroke with the arms. The video I've linked to shows them on a training row, but its quite easy to see them pulling in to their lap and not really yanking hard at the finish. That's not to say that there haven't been a lot of crews who've gone fast by pulling hard with the arms, but the majority of power in any fast boat has to be applied by the legs.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

HTML hit counter - Quick-counter.net