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Ruud_G

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 #1 
Respiratory muscle endurance, oxygen saturation index in vastus lateralis and performance during heavy exercise.
Oueslati F, et al. Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2016.
Authors
Oueslati F1, Boone J2, Ahmaidi S3.
Author information
1EA-3300: APERE, Department of Sport Sciences, University of Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France. Electronic address: oueslati.ferid@hotmail.com.
2Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
3EA-3300: APERE, Department of Sport Sciences, University of Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens, France.
Citation
Respir Physiol Neurobiol. 2016 Feb 23. pii: S1569-9048(16)30015-5. doi: 10.1016/j.resp.2016.02.008. [Epub ahead of print]
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between respiratory muscle endurance, tissue oxygen saturation index dynamics of leg muscle (TSI) and the time to exhaustion (TTE) during high intensity exercise. Eleven males performed a respiratory muscle endurance test, a maximal incremental running field test (8km.h(-1)+0.5km.h(-1) each 60s) and a high-intensity constant speed field test at 90% VO2max. The TSI in vastus lateralis was monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. The TSI remained steady between 20 and 80% of TTE. Between 80 and 100% of TTE (7.5±6.1%, p<0.05), a significant drop in TSI concomitant with a minute ventilation increase (16±10l.min(-1)) was observed. Moreover, the increase of ventilation was correlated to the drop in TSI (r=0.70, p<0.05). Additionally, respiratory muscle endurance was significantly correlated to TSI time plateau (20-80% TTE) (r=0.83, p<0.05) and to TTE (r=0.95, p<0.001). The results of the present study show that the tissue oxygen saturation plateau might be affected by ventilatory work and that respiratory muscle endurance could be considered as a determinant of performance during heavy exercise.

Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.
juergfeldmann

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 #2 
Fun  to read isn't  it. I may have to start showing   research  from far back  with exactly this  result  . They used  most likely a  Portamon or  Oxymon NIRS as they looked d at  TSI  %..  Next  step  they  can look is  using Portamon  and  MOXY  as in some cases,  when  the respiratory system is overloaded  and we  collect a lot  of  CO2  we see an increase in RF  and a drop in TV  and therefor  in the VO2  a  drop in At

EtCO2  as discussed in another post  so they name it  " hyper ventilation, when in fact it is hyper pnea  and hypoventilation. SmO2  will drop  due to  O2  Disscurve shift.
 Now in some cases, where the CO2  seem to create a lot of  body temperature  we will see an increase in TSI   and in MOXY  still a  drop. TSI %  is  calculated  with T1  and T3 in use  so an opening of  blood vessels in the skin often shows  up over a  T!  but  than  we may see a drop in T# . The end result  sometime is an increase  in TSI  as harder   we go , which than  looks  confusing  for many    who  take TSI %  as  SmO2    when in fact MOXY  tests muscular O2  trend  where as  TSI is  tissue  saturation index  so  skin  and muscle combined.  Rudd nice paper  and the regular readers  may see, that some of our ideas here how  respiration  and NIRS  may interact   could be actually possible  and usable ?   Now  this  is  what than  can eb  taken  as well.
  W All is about  energy  and as  such O2  trends.
 So yes  lactate has a connection to O2  and as  such  to  NIRS  trends.
 Now here we see  reparations  has a  direct influence of O2  and as  such on NIRS  trends.
 Os  disscurve  shifts.
 So next  will be that we  say  VT ( ventilatory threshold  =  NIRS break point  and  nirs break point =  LT.
 It can be that close  but it  can be very off.
 NIRS is a one  location feedback  which can be used  for some   conclusions  over all Better  is  2  MOXYS  to see  is it local  or systemically. . I  can create  in a   forearm  muscle a NIRS break point  without   having a  VT or LT.
fitbyfred

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Posts: 168
 #3 
Yes, it's fun to see the different parts and the interpretation: 

"The TSI remained steady between 20 and 80% of TTE. Between 80 and 100% of TTE (7.5±6.1%, p<0.05), a significant drop in TSI concomitant with a minute ventilation increase (16±10l.min(-1)) was observed.

Moreover, the increase of ventilation was correlated to the drop in TSI (r=0.70, p<0.05). Additionally, respiratory muscle endurance was significantly correlated to TSI time plateau (20-80% TTE) (r=0.83, p<0.05) and to TTE (r=0.95, p<0.001)."


At only 100 L min. VE what's most likely happening to lend to TSI drop ?

Thanks for starting this one Ruud, 
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