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Andri

Fortiori Design LLC
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Posts: 65
 #31 

I completely agree. This goes back a little be to false assumptions based on anaerobic or lactate theories. The fact is that aerobic metabolism is the primary contributor to all activities regardless of intensity or duration. The term anaerobic may be outside of biochemical equations, rather into terms of applied exercise physiology non-sensical. 

Kirill

Development Team Member
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Posts: 93
 #32 
I see prolonged SmO2 recovery only after deadlift and squat.


It does not follow that in isolated exercises, creatine phosphate is recovered instantaneously.

8-10 minutes need for full recovery 2B/X (fast glycolitic, low mitochondria) fibres, 
because their mitochondria slowly restore creatine phosphate.

Although some studies have found in isolated exercises the correlation between
the curve of reoxygenation and the resynthesis of creatine phosphate,
I decided for myself to focus on basic multijoint exercises.

I really enjoyed using the oximetry sensor in disputes about the most effective exercise for some muscles, because it essentially performs indirectly the functions of electromyography and metabolism.


The sensor in the picture was on the center of hamstring


Deadlift.jpg 

Andri

Fortiori Design LLC
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Posts: 65
 #33 

Hi Kirill

Interesting. We have a lot of anecdotal evidence that poor pulmonary power has a negative effect on SmO2 recovery, and that pulmonary muscle training in these individuals increases the rate of SmO2 recovery.

To your comments that SmO2 recovery is prolonged in multi-joint high effort exercises like deadlift or squat could fit into this model, as this type of work has a great stress on the pulmonary systems in bioenergetic terms and in muscle contraction terms (breath holding). In a smaller isolated muscle on the other hand, the pulmonary muscles not taxed and therefore would not effect the Smo2 recovery.

Something to think about.


Cheers
Andri

bobbyjobling

Development Team Member
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Posts: 205
 #34 
Would placing Moxy on a non involved muscle show a pulmonary "problem" during a deadlift?. I suppose its a bit difficult to find a non involved muscle when performing a deadlift.

Also, a relatively low HR to muscle volume activation would make the pulmonary system work harder and contribute to slow recovery of SmO2 + greater right shift of disscurve.  


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