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coachluke

Development Team Member
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Posts: 3
 #1 
Hi there everyone,
I am new to the forum but have been using the Moxy last year to help assess all of our athletes.  I have slowly been integrating the 5-1-5 protocol.  Here is data that I'd like to get some feedback on.  
This athlete seems to have great ability to oxygenate below 175 HR but quickly looses control after that.  I think there are two main limitations: first, a functional respiratory limitation that would explain the loss of O2 control.  Second, a functional muscular limitation which would explain the fast drop off of O2 at the upper end.  

Does anybody have anything to add or change to what I am seeing?  Thanks for the help!
Luke

 
Attached Files
pdf BPR_Athlete.pdf (406.65 KB, 32 views)

coachluke

Development Team Member
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Posts: 3
 #2 
BPR athlete 1st 30min.PNG first 30mins...
BPR athlete last 30min.PNG  Last 30mins

juergfeldmann

Development Team Member
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Posts: 1,501
 #3 
Luke , welcome  and thanks  for offering us  some insight  information. If  you could   sent me on here or  e mail the CSV  file  or better  if you use  Peripedal the peripedal  file  so I  can move it on our  interpretation option to look somewhat specific . If you  used peripedal than we  as well have  HR I  do not needed the wattage  steps  at all   so just  thb  smo2  and  if   possible HR  as well. Thanks   and I will be back to look on what we have  for now.
coachluke

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 #4 
here is the Peripedal csv fle

 
Attached Files
csv BPR_Athlete_from_peripedal.csv (142.09 KB, 21 views)

Andri

Fortiori Design LLC
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Posts: 65
 #5 
Hi Luke

Quickly looking over the data the first point I would make is about the this part you identify "functional muscular limitation which would explain the fast drop off of O2 at the upper end". Quickly to put this into my context increase I misunderstood something. I assume that when you say upper end you are talking about the last steps, so after minute 52. Prior to minute 52 SmO2 is able to remain fairly stable for the step duration and tHb looks to actually climb a bit (you can see that HR is actually slightly drifting up as well). It would appear that an effort is made to maintain SmO2 balance for performance. Then when the intensity increases with the next step, this effort to maintain balance is no longer enough and SmO2 drops, despite tHb actually still increasing during the load. Considering this, to me it looks like the limitation is one of oxygen supply rather than oxygen utilization. Now granted, the value of SmO2 does not drop to very low numbers (dips just below 50%),but the trend does not show any type of plateau in the situation. So the question can SmO2 drop lower remains. If you do more of a sprint based test, does SmO2 drop lower? Can it? What happens to tHb? The question is how does the central life depending systems like the heart or the respiratory system react as feedback is given that considering the pace oxygen supply will not be sufficient? How far ahead do these systems calculate, and are better trained individuals more likely to push these boundaries as their physiological systems have more performance to rebound than an untrained person. This would then be the next question what type of athlete are we dealing with. Just some thoughs.

 

Andrew

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Posts: 45
 #6 
Andri,
I understand your observations, and will challenge Luke the next time we visit for some fun testing, to see if he is indeed able to desaturate more with some shorter, harder efforts. As you noticed, his last step, he was barely holding it together, but was continuing to desaturate, without ever reaching a low plateau.

I am interested in your observation of a possible "oxygen supply limitation".
I see an upward trend in tHb in the final full step (53-58 minutes), and would have thought this meant he was in fact overcoming any limitation in supply, through a combination of increased cardiac output, and possible vasodilation. 

But, I also noted that in the rest period just before this final full step, his tHb did not recover as high as in previous rest periods, with a corresponding SmO2 that did not supersaturate as high. 

I wonder if you, or anyone who has been following the discussions, could comment on these trends, and help me understand where you would come to a conclusion of a oxygen supply limitation, rather than muscular strength limitation?
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