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Roger

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 #1 
Presented by Chris Balser from Bicycle Fit Guru

bicyclefitguru

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 #2 
Hi, Folks

Please excuse my over-caffeinated presentation and Q&A.  

I only just listened to the webinar today and want to make sure people are comfortable asking me questions on the forum or directly.  I am a bit nuts, but not in a mean-way.

I've had a few requests to expand on bicycle geometry as it relates to positioning, and will have something together as soon as my season gets a bit more manageable. 

Truly,
Chris

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Chris Balser
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juergfeldmann

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 #3 
 I am a bit nuts, but not in a mean-way.

 That is  what we like   so no rush .
bicyclefitguru

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 #4 
In did a poor job responding to the question: "How can someone measure Inspiratory Muscle Fatigue".  Think I said something like, "I do not know... maybe user reporting?", which is neither helpful nor a good plan. 
I'm working on a protocol for this and would love some help/feedback from the partners.
Problem:  Triathletes riding in more aggressive hip angles/trunk positions tend to experience difficulty in transition (hip-flexor tension) and reduced running efficacy when compared to non-cycling pre-conditions.
It makes sense that the posas issue can be reduced significantly by increasing the virtual seat tube angle (horizontal plane, bottom bracket center and greater trochanter), but can this also account for improved running? 
Let's assume that all joint angles and muscle recruitment patterns are optimized in two positions -- 74-degrees and 79-degrees virtual seat tube angles. The more relaxed geometry (74-degrees) tends to increase lumbar muscle recruitment relative to the more aggressive (79-degrees) geometry.  I've documented this trend using sEMG sensors on the quadratus lumborum muscles of cyclists on an automated sizing-bike programmed to maintain a rider's position (with small, necessary adjustments to saddle height) at different geometries.  
We know that the QL muscles contribute to diaphraghm function, contracting during inhalation and relaxing for exhalation.  If a rider's position incorporates significant tension in this region, they might experience difficulty exhaling (though most people don't attend to this aspect of breathing[wink] and inspriatory muscle fatigue.
So maybe a better answer to that questions is to measure SmO2 and tHB at the QL during bike fitting to ensure healthy respitory muscle function. 

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Chris Balser
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