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CraigMahony

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 #16 
Yes Juerg I accept all this. However, I do not see that it applies to a 100m runner doing maximum velocity or acceleration repetitions that last 6 seconds or less. It would apply when the distances are longer and the time taken greater, eg if they were doing speed endurance or tempo repetitions where or if they were doing speed sessions for middle distance.

All the examples so far have been 20 seconds or 30 seconds. These are not pure sprints. (Apologies to any 400m out there)

What I am most interested in is if a Moxy can be used to determine the recovery of 30 - 60m sprints for maximum velocity or acceleration and thus requiring the highest muscular recruitment they can generate. Traditionally, sprint athletes take a long recovery because of 'neuromuscular' fatigue. As you mentioned Juerg, there are various things that cause an inhibition to muscular contraction. Will there be anything inhibiting muscular contraction, eg Pi, after SmO2 has recovered to its highest value? Will an athlete be ready to run another 30m - 60m repetition for maximum velocity / acceleration after SmO2 recovery has peaked at its highest value.(As opposed to a HIT repetition for improvement of metabolic processes). 

Another idea is should the athlete take longer breaks to make sure that the O2 metabolism is reduced as that is what it will be like in an actual race?
juergfeldmann

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 #17 
Craig. I  do not know and have no answer to all this great points. There is  very  few  if any  published  data  out  in this  directions. So   I can not give you an answer  and back it up  from an accepted source.
 We  internally just  do some specific  ideas and try  to get a handle on this  questions but not confirmed  and not  backed up  so  nothing to go about  than just asses ,  try out  re asses  and that's what we  do since many years. Many of  the loads  of  6  sec    +-  are important  issue  in sports like ski jumping or Nordic  combine or tennis  or  ice hockey or  any training  like  for  shot  put  or  other similar  sports. So less for the  race day but training  for the training  to improve efficiency  and effect of  workouts.   so we looked for us  at  the   rest  in between jumps  to have the best  and   most   optimal  situation  at the take of.  There we  have some ideas  but not  confirmed  at all. I  use   many of our  ideas on here, once I  can find confirmations  from accepted sources independent  for what we  do. So  we may have to wait  a few more  month or years before we have  decent  answer on this.
juergfeldmann

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Posts: 1,501
 #18 
This  thread  created a lot of  email reactions. Here one  part  we look at based on actual  accepted  research.
 It is a gain as you can see a direct connection to respiration.

Resynthesis of creatine phosphate in human muscle after exercise in relation to intramuscular pH and availability of oxygen.

Sahlin KHarris RCHultman E.

Abstract

After exhaustive exercise the muscular store of creatine phosphate (CP) is almost completely depleted. The resynthesis of CP during recovery normally occurs rapidly, but is totally inhibited if the local circulation to the muscle is occluded. The limiting factor for CP resynthesis which could be a low intramuscular pH or availability of oxygen has been investigated in the present study. Biopsies from musculis quadriceps femoris of man were analyzed for pH, ATP, ADP, CP, creatine, lactate and pyruvate. It was shown that resynthesis of CP only occurs when the blood supply to the muscle is intact. From this it was concluded that the creatine kinase reaction is at a steady state or at equilibrium during the period of recovery. The influence of oxygen on the resynthesis of CP was investigated by incubating muscle samples taken after a fatiguing isometric contraction in atmospheres of oxygen and nitrogen, respectively. During 15 min incubation in oxygen CP was resynthesized from a starting value of 4% to 68% of the normal value at rest. No resynthesis was observed when parallel muscle samples were incubated for the same time in nitrogen.

 It is suggested that the initial fast phase of CP resynthesis is limited by the availability of oxygen whereas the subsequent slow phase is limited by the hydrogen ion transport out from the muscle.

PMID:

 Initial phase we use SmO2  respectively  O2Hb  reactions in combination with tHb

. For the slow   second phase we look at  EtCO2 levels  ( normocanic or  even hypocapnic  as  a part of  H +  balance in combination

juergfeldmann

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Posts: 1,501
 #19 
Answer is  YES. to the  question. Can  MOXY  show  this  statements 
 

 It is suggested that the initial fast phase of CP resynthesis is limited by the availability of oxygen whereas the subsequent slow phase is limited by the hydrogen ion transport out from the muscle.

PMID:

Here   some internal studies    we use for workouts.

3 different all out loads. Look first the statement of  blood flow needed  to get O2 in  to recovery Cr.P.

3 sets  thb   like  15 Crp.jpg 

Draw  the SmO2 trend in this graph.



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