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Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
Registered:
Posts: 1,530
 #1 
The  trend towards  opening a  fair discussion on current believes  is in full swing since many years but starts  to create more and more traction as we now have an alternative to design training intensities.  with MOXY . Here a very nice blog   and I lie the section of " There is No such thing like an anaerobic threshold or lactate threshold.
 http://arcrsa.blogspot.ca/2007/08/there-is-no-lactate-threshold.html  So  why would I try to " replace" a lactate threshold idea  "  with a   new technology    like MOXY , when there is no such thing like a lactate threshold.
 Seems to me   it does not make a lot of sense  to  create  a new technology to replace  something  which does not exist  and say it is now  a  noninvasive   method  to find  a lactate threshold ??
 just some loud thinking.
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
Registered:
Posts: 1,530
 #2 
Is there a summary to the blog
 Yes  here is a  short  part of it.


 There is NO lactate threshold
Okay, now we know that the muscles don’t go anaerobic during heavy exercise and lactate production is due to carbohydrate being burned to produce energy. This brings us to the topic of “lactate threshold”. Recall that the theory of lactate threshold was that at some exercise intensity blood lactate levels increase dramatically, i.e. crosses a threshold, due to anaerobic metabolism. We already know that lactate is being produced in increasing high amounts for reasons other than the muscles becoming “anaerobic”, but is lactate increasing after crossing some “threshold”? Again, the answer is no.

Lactate increases exponentially with increases in exercise intensity and does NOT exhibit a threshold. This being the case, why did exercise physiologists believe there was a lactate threshold? Going back to Prof. Noakes again:
“This mistaken conclusion resulted from at least 2 errors. First, too few blood samples were measured. For example, if only 4 blood samples had been drawn at running speeds of 10, 14, 16, and 20 km per hour, then a fictitious anaerobic threshold would have been identified at 15.5 km per hour. But measuring blood lactate concentrations repeatedly – for example every km per hour – shows that blood lactate concentrations rise exponentially without any evidence of a threshold phenomenon.”

“It is clear that the blood lactate concentrations do not show a clearly defined, abrupt threshold response during exercise of progressively increasing intensity. Rather, blood lactate concentrations begin to rise as soon as progressive exercise commences. However, at low intensities, the rate of the increase is so low that it is barely noticeable. Only when the exercise becomes more intense does the rise become apparent, which perhaps explains the erroneous impression that blood lactate concentrations increase abruptly when the lactate threshold is reached.”

“For these reasons, the term anaerobic threshold, lactate threshold, and lactate turnpoint are no longer justifiable”(4)


So, you see, there is not a lactate threshold. Lactate increases exponentially with increases in exercise intensity and exhibits no evidence of a “threshold”.
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