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Gunnar

Development Team Member
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Posts: 66
 #1 
Hi all,

How is it possible to see if someone has a muscular vascularisation limitation with moxy?
And how would an improvement in muscular vascularisation look like when looking at the smo2 and thb curves?
bjrmd

Development Team Member
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Posts: 44
 #2 
First read this:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28819005
It's a study looking at NIRS signals in peripheral artery disease.
But with simple SmO2 monitoring you can't tell whether the O2 drop depth is related to flow (decrease) or higher extraction. 
From that paper:
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The THb is also problematic and is also not a measure of flow.

CraigMahony

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Posts: 178
 #3 
The extract does not indicate if they measured or recorded tHb. I believe this combined with SmO2 can give a clue. Although muscular compression can confuse the issue by reducing venous outflow thus causing a build up of total Hb within the muscle causing SmO2 to decline.

It would be nice if there was some software that was available that graphed O2Hb and HHb in real time. That would make some things more apparent.

Possibly a pulmonary limitation would show up in a 5-1-5 test or during intervals by the SmO2 rebounds during rest becoming greater during each rest period. The tHb may also increase during each work period. This is all due to increased levels of CO2 building up during the work interval which causes a dilation of the blood vessels. Had the vascularisation been sufficient, there would not have been as great a build up of CO2 to cause this. Another way is when SmO2 is delayed in its rebound after a work period compared to tHb, also caused by CO2. However, other factors, such as muscular compression, cause these effects to not be very apparent.
bjrmd

Development Team Member
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Posts: 44
 #4 
Measuring flow is much more complex than just looking at total Hb.
There are several methods including dye dilution with NIRS and occlusions looking at THb and SmO2.
Here are the references if you are interested.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29034529
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18685453
If you look at studies addressing this question, they generally use the above methods.

However, looking for muscular compressive effects (as in weight training) can be done and is potentially useful.  It can help titrate appropriate loads in lifting.
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