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Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
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 #31 
Nice feedback  do you have the csv  file.
  Than  how  was his  feeling when he  was doing them ?
 In a first glance interesting is , that his tHb is much higher after his  workout,  than  after  what we  would call  " warm  up." Interesting to  find a  way  to increase tHb  so the  actual workout is done with a higher tHb  and a  high SmO2.
S.M.

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 #32 
He said he "felt fine", could have done more.  It was done outside and our weather has turned from sunny warm and 15 degrees to cold, windy and zero.  He describes his warm up as very slowing, shuffling along at best.
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
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 #33 
Here the " physiological " impression.

first in  words.
 He  did  NOT pushed  all out  and in fact pushed less hard  than the first   time.
 Here my points  to be  argued  as usual
 1. SmO2  desaturation amplitude.
 2. Respiratory feedback on  CO2  retention.
Graph  to show it  for discussion.
  SmO2  amplitude. overlap . The red arrows  are  same height  amplitude.

3 loads  overlapp  smo2.jpg


In fact as you can see  first load  was similar like a later load in the  first  workout.
comp  1 and 2 smo2  amplitued.jpg

Here the second point Lag time  for SmO2  re-saturation.

below first  time   all out first load  and second load  look  the same  so here first load.
first  super close.jpg

Than  the  first load  second  workout.

second   first load thb  smo2.jpg  Now   if  I look at the hardest  in the second  which was the second load it looks    similar  and a  slightly indication of a lag  time  of SmO2.

second   second hardest  load thb  smo2.jpg

Now  one  point  I  am not sure is  in the  first load the Lag time  of SmO2 and the tHb  reaction.
  It  could look as  it is a venous occlusion  but there are some reason  why I  tend to think  it is a  CO2  respiratory overload lag time  with a  secondary  reaction of a vasodilatation  due to the CO2   level.
 The reason  why  I tend towards  this is  the many SEMG  assessments  I  did  in running  and cycling  and  it is  very very  seldom  , that  you reach  even in an all out run a venous occlusion n the vastus  lateralis  in running  as  this muscle is  just not enough involved  to create this incredible  force. But  that never ever means  this is  always true. So this is an open point and when  this athlete is doing   more of this type of  workouts  we  will get the answer  for sure.
 . Now here what you  can  try.
  Do  a hypocapnic  respiration  30  seconds  long before going all out  so you start  with a PCO2  of  perhaps  25 - 30  instead of  35 +- . This means  than we  have a  little bit of  a  space   to load  CO2  before we  have a  hypercapnic  situation.
 It is the old  trick  you did  as a kid in u your swim test to cross the pool   under water. (  not  always a smart idea In water  but relative  secure on land.. It is  all about  H + balance.
  See idea on words.

 
Attached Files
docx imbalance_of_H_+.docx (66.82 KB, 26 views)

S.M.

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 #34 
Excellent.  I will have him try that.  I have been using that technique with beginner runners as they approach a hill and they have been having great success with it.
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
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 #35 
Thanks  Sandy. I will be back and show  you how  we may be able  to add to the SmO2 increase in his  " warm up " as well a much higher tHb  ( blood flow  with some easy  tricks  which   can work (  still no cook book so have to try   so will be back. Cheers
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
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 #36 
Warm up idea  will come  to try out. Here first so we  d not get lost  a additional  small case studie  from a while back  to show  the interesting connection in cardiac  and respiratory team work.

physio flow  and  respiration.jpg  This are  results using a  Physio flow and different respiratory interventions. To control , whether we  are  hyper or hypocapnic  we   use a  small capnometer  (Emma). Now  important is  to  wait the RQ  is not RER  as many remember  so EtCO2  ( end  tidal CO2  levels  are  not  immediately reflection the Pa  or PA  CO2  level.. The    CO2  level  we see in Emma has to be maintain  for   4  - 8 min  if possible.  other wise  we   do not have a  close ( never optimal   result on what is in the blood and what is in the expiratory  air..
 For hypocapnic  we   try to stay around    below  30 mmHg  and for hypercapnic  we try to reach around  45 - 50 mmHg. The 45 - 50 mmHg  will show up as a SpO2  in the finger pulse oxymeter of  around 92 +- 2 %.








S.M.

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 #37 
Rick 043015.PNG Here is his last intensity where he did the hypocapnic breathing prior to the first intensity.
Ruud_G

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 #38 
Maybe have some dogs running up and down for interval recovery
Juerg Feldmann

Fortiori Design LLC
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 #39 
ha ha  Ruud  you know , you are not  far off  on how to improve  warm up ideas you are getting very close  and I will show you some case studies  from different clients. But  you actually have it.
  Sandy  great  feedback agian  sent me the csv  file  and we can look closer again to   keep working on the ideas  we  may be able to read  out.

Here  below an example of a cardiac   patient. You can see the first  3  loads  5 min load  1 min rest  were 50 watt. We  can see, as in most cases ,a great increase in SmO2,  but not really in tHb  with exception in the rest period  like with the dog. Now  you have 2  options   in a warm. The most classical idea is to warm up very slow   or better veyr low intensity.
 
 Start very  slow (low intensty ) and  observe  SmO2  . The  physiological reactions  of  cardiac  hemodynamic, vascularisation reations  and  Respiratory adjustment   need a  time of   somewhere between  8 - 15 min. MOXY will tell you the inidvidual optimal time. If  SmO2 is going up  you  at least achive a higher oxygenation level  as   one possible goal of  metabolic warm  up ideas.
. After  2  - 3    loads  with a short rest (  does not has to be  1 min just look reaction [wink]  you can, as in thhis case, load a litle bit more  and see, whether the increase now in HR ( CO )  may actually start to overrule the muscle compression restriction.
 In this case we moved  up  to 55  watt. Result: you can see, tHb now  starts  to move up as well  and SmO2  is  as well still increaseing..
 so we increase  again 5 more wattts. , and s on.
 
Than  you can see the feedback, where we   do not achive  anymore an increase in tHb  or in SmO2.

 Now  you can be happy or  you could reduce  the load  a little bit and see, whether you achive  an even  better  result or  whether the result is  todays optimal  situation in tHb  and SmO2  you can achive.
 Just as a side note.
 In this case the idea  was  to produce a  stroke volume  stimmulation  to increase the SV  so we  can achive a reduction in  HR  to avoid the  need  for  a betablocker. You can see in the follow up SV  load  workout  we  achive  all the time  even in lower intensitis  a higher tHb  as well as a higher SmO2  but   with a lower HR.
.  
barb leg 1 st wk.jpg  .
 Summary.
Try in " warm ups" to use the  flight and fight stress reactions ( Cannon  and H . Selye.)
 meaning that you not just gradually increase load  or  intensity, but  make  short  sudden alarm reactions  so the body  will have to react functionally and  than when the reaction is  succesfull  keep it so the structurala situation can pick up..
 Simple example.  Stress reaction  for CO increase is often  over  HR  and not as often over SV. So  a  sudden increase in HR  to compensate  for the needed  CO  will be followed by a structural   feedback in the way that we increase the vascularisation reaction ( vasodilatation  and than the SV  as a secondary reaction.
 To be able to see, whether this works  you simly get rid  suddently of the functional stress HR  by stopping so  drammatically reduce the load  and see, whether the  relaxation of muslce contraction allows  the vasodilatation  effect,  so increase of tHb(blood flow) and thereforr pre load and therefor  SV . Than repate it again and see what happens.

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