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sebo2000

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Posts: 227
 #1 
Can somebody comment and explain this phenomenon [smile]

Some background: This was my best day in last 30 days, everything recovered legs, Resp, CO. Perfect form for the race day. Top 2 graphs Moxy on VL and 2 bottom graphs from Deltoid.

My system was not fully warmed up, after reading Daniele's post yesterday I figured instead of my usual workout, I will switch view to power and do power driven intervals\experiments again.

Top yellow graph is power so you can see when interval was on and when it was off. It was consistent 290 watts just shy of 300W

1 min ON, 1 min OFF then after 4 intervals I decided to make off time only 30s because I was getting cold in my basement [smile]

You can see shorter lap marks showing rest and longer time ON.

Check every other 1 min interval, they seem to have different physiological load...

Smo2 and Thb seems to increase in one 1 min ON then decrease in other then increase again, when comparing to VL where reaction is exactly the same every interval.

Was my entire system so well recovered it didn't bother to even kick in every interval, but decided to do a bit of work every other interval, I'm sure if I would increase power to 400W I would see identical reaction in both VL and Deltoid.

Was shortening recovery to 30s overloading my stroke volume more, it looks like my VL tHb drops, but my deltoid tHb increases at the same time, and it does it with much better amplitude than in the case of 1 min rests, but only every second interval really increases stroke volume??? Could this be considered low intensity stroke volume exercise?



60-30.JPG 






bobbyjobling

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Posts: 217
 #2 
Just thinking out loud:
It might be BP regulation system response, in the sense that it has a natural response frequency. If your load & rest frequency is at a particular rate the response of the Deltoid tHb & SmO2 could be out of synchronisation with your priority muscle tHb & SmO2.   

harmonic2.gif

bobbyjobling

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Posts: 217
 #3 
You could use FFT ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_Fourier_transform [wink]
on Deltoid SmO2 to find the various harmonic frequency and then deduce your BP response frequency.
juergfeldmann

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Posts: 1,501
 #4 
Fascinating stuff  and  have o get closer  o this  as BP  really  shows a  very nice  wave.  I have to go back and look at intervals  in this way where we as well had  physio flow on to see how  SVR  ( systemic vascular resistance  responded as a part  of BP  feedback. 
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