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AlexKilpatrick

Development Team Member
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Posts: 2
 #1 
Hi!

I thought I would share my first run with Moxy. I'm not a serious athlete, but I am a data nerd.

I don't have time to do a test right now, so I just took it on my regular run, 3.3 miles in my hilly neighborhood.  I didn't expect to get much actionable from this, I was mainly just trying to see if it all worked. Looking at the data, it all makes sense with my limited understanding of SMO2.  I can see the spike when I walked for a bit at the top of the peak hill, and I can see it take a dip on the steep hill at the end of my run.

But if anyone sees anything interesting in this data, let me know.

Green: Speed
Yellow: SmO2
Grey: Altitude

FirstRun.png

CraigMahony

Development Team Member
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Posts: 174
 #2 
Can you include tHb? This might show something not otherwise seen.
AlexKilpatrick

Development Team Member
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Posts: 2
 #3 
Here is a graph with tHB.  I haven't really looked at measuring hemoglobin, but it seems basically inversely related to oxygen?

Screen Shot 2017-11-01 at 10.41.49 AM.png 

CraigMahony

Development Team Member
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Posts: 174
 #4 
tHb is an indication of blood flow within the muscle. Your tHb rises while your SmO2 drops at some stages when you are going uphill. This can indicate a venous restriction causing blood pooling. The venous restriction is caused by muscle compression from strong muscle contractions. Now this might happen anyway if the climb is steep enough. However, if you do a 5-1-5 assessment and find this, it could indicate either a lack of strength in the muscle causing the muscle to more fully contract and thus restrict the blood flow, or, a lack of capillary density that does not allow sufficient blood flow through the contracted muscle.

The SmO2 can drop not because you are using more O2 but also because you are pooling deoxygenated blood. If you put the moxy on your VL, see what it reads then ly on your back and put your legs in the air you will see the SmO2 rise and the tHb drop. This is not because you are supplying more oxygenated blood but rather the deoxygenated blood is being returned faster so % of blood that is in the muscle and is oxygenated is higher. You might like to think of it as the O2HB(oxygenated) is not being diluted as much by the HHb(deoxygenated).

So SmO2 on its own can be misleading. You need to take into account what the tHb is doing as well. There are numerous posts in the forum on this.
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