Sign up Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment   Page 2 of 2      Prev   1   2
CraigMahony

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 178
 #16 
Sandor. I would not judge from my performances as I am slow compared to most other cyclists. Mind you I do not believe that doing threshold training or sweet spot training is the best way to go. I use polarised training of low intensity or high intensity with not much in the middle zone. I am now trying to understand more about physiological training as high intensity training will overload multiple limiters and compensators
DanieleM

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 264
 #17 
Hi Craig,

the reason for asking about training volume was because I noticed a trend which is different from few cases of trained cyclist where SmO2 is kept at balance for VL.
It seems like you have developed a good cardiovascular system, perhaps coming from a different sport, compared to the muscular one. 
ryinc

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 369
 #18 
@jeurg

I am not sure i undersood your posts. I thought it was a respiratory limitation. Can you confirm:

1. You identified a co-ordination and muscle limitation issue from the sharp drop in tHb at the start of loads and the pattern of small spikes and falls in tHb in the loads. So this is a limiter from the start of the assessment.
2. I wasn't sure what you were saying about venous occlusion. I don't see venous occlusion (no drop.in tHb on end of load) but was not sure if you were saying you do see one just not the typical one?
3. What is the compensator - i thought it was cardiac?
juergfeldmann

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 1,501
 #19 
The  venous occlusion idea is from your great  summary  , where it  could appear  at the  last   step  , that  due to increase in tHb  it  looks like a ven. occlusion. But  you give the first answer  why  possibly not.
 Than I give a feedback in  how we  still can look it  to be sure by locking  at O2Hb  and HHb.
 We  could have a fight between  vasodilatation    and out floe. If  we have  an incredible   good CO  and a  very weak  respiration  than we  can have a very high CO2    so vasodilatation  and a very high metabolic  vasodilatation   reaction include a  sudden very strong CO    so the out flow  despite a pooling if it is not too much  could be  covered  by an immediate increase in tHb. So  that's' when we look  at the load reaction  and O2 Hb  and HHb. If we  develop  during the load a venous occlusion  than the  O2  inflow is still okay but reduce  HHb out flow  so we have  a higher  HHb  than  O2 Hb     when tHb increase as we do not get rid    easy of HHb.


. I wasn't sure what you were saying about venous occlusion. I don't see venous occlusion (no drop.in tHb on end of load) but was not sure if you were saying you do see one just not the typical one?


You mentioned lacking in strength as the limiter. Muscle strength as a weakness often shows up as a venous occlusion, and i think within the last loads there is a suggestion that this could be occurring. However, venous occlusion can be confirmed on trends of tHb and Sm02 immediately once load stops - what would we expect when load is removed with a venous occlusion in terms of tHb and do we observe it in this assessment?

It looks  , when we  follow the SmO2 trend  a " reloading    problem so  CO2  may sneak  up slowly.
  and yes I think  it looks  for me  that the  cardiac  system  tries to compensate.
ryinc

Development Team Member
Registered:
Posts: 369
 #20 
Thanks for the further explanation Jeurg.
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

HTML hit counter - Quick-counter.net