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kptrzk

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 #16 
Regarding my typical desaturation range, I usually peak just under 70% and bottom out around upper 20%. This session could be an anomaly as I've had a few intense sessions Monday and Tuesday (+7 hours over the 2 days) coupled with strength training. This assessment seems lower power-wise as well. This ended on the 390w step, for reference I have done 4x8mins >410w (with only 2min rest). Maybe just lower fitness [frown]

No breathing tool - however my respiratory rate during the assessment was certainly not in the "gasping" territory.  I practice a lot of nasal/belly breathing and exhaling forcefully to release CO2. Unfortunately no way to measure other than the sensor. 

Perhaps the SmO2% sudden drops after efforts have to do with fatigue. Regarding SmO2 recovery, how would one differentiate between a lagging and sudden recovery back to baseline?
kptrzk

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 #17 
Question on application and adaptations: is there merit to finding the point where certain occlusions form and then training at those occlusions? For instance, would specifically targeting and training with a venous occlusion show better adaptations?

I've read through the forum over and over about identifying occlusions. But what application can the athlete take from the identification?

Thanks
Kim

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 #18 
Hmmm.... I would use SmO2 during workouts but looking at occlusion is very helpful when strength training. If the goal is muscle hypertrophy, you should monitor trends in blood flow. If you lift medium weight or heavy weight based on your 1 RM, you’ll see when you have a venous or arterial occlusion. This is when muscle hypertrophy occurs but you must go close to failure. If lifting medium weight, this would look like high reps, lower weight and if lifting closer to max, lower reps and heavy weight.
MoxyPhysiology

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 #19 
@kim and @kptrzk, great discussion I agree with all of the points that @kim made. 

@kptrzk, in terms of the decrease in SmO2 at the onset of recovery, you could be getting a compression response which results in less blood flowing to the area being monitored, upon release of that compression blood flow is no longer limited to the area causing an influx of oxygenated blood (illustrated by an increase in THb) that can then meet the oxygen demand of the muscle, causing a net decrease in SmO2. 

Finally, the inability to desaturate could be an indicator of acute fatigue as you did a fair amount of training the days before the test. Going forward you could use this example as an example to inform training decisions (in terms of whether to go heard or recover). Simply, if you cannot desaturate this indicates some form of fatigue which would most likely benefit from a rest day. 
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