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Richardpullan

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 #1 
Hi group. Did my first 5-1-5 test at the weekend. This was completed at sea level. (attached).

I will do another one this week in my altitude chamber which is set to 14.5% O2 (3,000m), so you can see a comparison. I will try and keep the same watts, so it will effectively be a harder session.

I will then also do some Repeated Sprints 10x 30s on/30s off and will try and do these at sea level and then also at altitude.

I am middle aged and unfit!. 

Comment on the attached 5-1-5; I should have reduced my wattage for the last couple of intervals as 250w was a bit ambitious for me; I think the result shows I am mentally weak as I couldn't complete the last stage (brain coming up with great reasons to stop).

Other observations; the first rest phase I sat up which I think had an impact on blood flow. Just before the end of the second interval I coughed (not feeling great) which resulted in the THb dip. Welcome others observations.

normoxic 515-100-150-200-250-5-feb-17.png

 
Attached Files
csv normoxic_515-100-150-200-250-5-feb-17_(version_2).csv (71.34 KB, 7 views)

bobbyjobling

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 #2 
Excellent, looking forward to the 515 at altitude. Welcome to the forum [smile]
Richardpullan

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 #3 
Here is my second 5-1-5 test. Same as before, this time at 3,250m. I couldn't manage the last stage, so i just did three, it definitely was a lot harder (not mentally, but physically).

As you can see my SmO2 is lower for each hypoxic stage which is as expected, but the recovered SmO2 is higher than the normoxic one, which is interesting. Also as you can see, blood flow is much higher in the hypoxic session (probably why I have a higher recovered SmO2). I worked out that the dips in THb were due to my leg angle on the recovery, trying to find a relaxed position smoothed this out. normoxix_v_hypoxic.png 

 
Attached Files
csv hypoxic_515-100-150-200-8-feb-17.csv (140.46 KB, 7 views)

sebo2000

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 #4 

Hi Richard,

 Very interesting data, I was always wondering how those tents work. I’m kind of surprised that at over 3000m SmO2 doesn’t drop more.

Also interesting SmO2 trend in first interval, how long were you in the tent before starting the interval? Could higher SmO2 be caused by the fact you just stepped in to the tent and still have residual O2 in your blood?

 Do you have data from rest/calibration period? It would be cool to see SmO2 levels at rest inside and outside of the tent. Did you measure your SpO2 in the tent, do you mind sharing that as well?

 In hypoxic state tHb trend indicates not recovered or compensating cardiac system, tHb doesn’t spike as it probably is maxed out already, in 2nd and  5th rest, we can see hemoglobin curve shift to the right.

Do you sleep in it or only train?

 Sebo

Richardpullan

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Posts: 8
 #5 
Hi Sebo2000. Yes it seems that muscle oxygen is being maintained, probably through increased blood flow to that particular muscle area.

I basically got straight into the altitude chamber, messed around with gadgets and stuff then got on with the session (probably 5 minutes max). When we measure SpO2, that usually desaturated within 60-120 seconds when you are in an altitude chamber. I'm sure it would get flushed out of the muscles quite quickly, but that could be something to look at/study. I will do the test of the resting values, inside and out for 1 hour and will also measure SpO2 at the same time.

Our company installs altitude simulation equipment, sleeping and exercising. I'm interested in using Moxy for training. Will upload an interval session now.



Richardpullan

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Posts: 8
 #6 
Here is the test data of 10x 30 second sprints, 30 seconds rest @ 3,250m. Looks to me like blood flow increased throughout the session and muscle oxygen was able to recover above base line for all sessions apart from the last one. Indicating that maybe I needed more rest on that last interval. 

After the session, blood flow was down probably because I was betting such good muscle oxygen levels and blood flow was going back to other areas and helping with cooling.

hypoxic-interval-13-feb-17.png 

 
Attached Files
csv hypoxic-interval-13-feb-17.csv (70.50 KB, 7 views)

sebo2000

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Posts: 227
 #7 

Hi Richard,

 

I would expect your hemoglobin curve to shift to the right, but that’s not the case, or I missed it in the csv file (does anyone see hemoglobin curve shift here? ), tHb slowly increases due to excessive CO2 and vasodilation.

 

During rest your SmO2 recovers immediately and we are most likely dealing with powerful vasoconstriction that redirects O2 to vital organs, and strong cardiac.

 

Your resting HR in both cases is above 100 is that normal? At what value is your SpO2 during rest before exercise in the tent? It seems like CO is compensating for low oxygen levels, are you logging SpO2 levels during exercise?

 

To check systemic reactions: can you do following:

 

Same for inside and outside of the tent:

 

Place Moxy on Deltoid, jump on the bike and do nothing for 3-4 minutes, check HR and SpO2 level, then start just two 5min steps from 5-1-5 assessment.

 

Can you keep Moxy on Deltoid outside for 10min then go for 10min inside the tent while monitoring HR as well and doing nothing (just do the same “nothing” inside and outside) I’m wondering if tHb and HR will increase in the tent?

 

After sprints did you just rest and did nothing? HR seems to be stuck at 130-140level, looks like your hart is getting the biggest workout, compensating for low oxygen levels. So it looks like altitude tent in your case here is really overloading your HR big time, was that the intention?

 

If you are injured and cannot workout at full high load tent seems be great bench press for your heart.

 

I’m surprised heart can compensate that well, I guess it would be also beneficial if you want to have very strong heart but “smaller muscles” for climbing perhaps? Sorry I’m always looking at things from cycling perspective.

 

If it comes to sprints, it seems tent is not the most efficient way of training, you are really overloading your cardiac system more than legs.

This is very interesting, is this tent fully sealed? Can you post pic of it, if you can fit in in with the bike it has to be huge?

S.

Richardpullan

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Posts: 8
 #8 
Hi Seb

Some photos attached. This is at my home. Small chamber with two spin bikes (with watts). The generator is in the room next door.

I have given my Moxy to the office so have just ordered another one and will do more tests when it arrives. Also attached are a couple of papers we published using altitude training in repeated sprints, these were short sprints on a treadmill, just 6 seconds with 30 seconds recovery.

Please note, I am not fit and I'm middle aged! My resting heart rate is about 60 bpm, I did warm up before starting the sprint test, hence the elevated heart rate. I worked to my max during the 30 second sprints and recovered with leg in stationary position. The last recovery I cycled gently . Generally heart rate is about 10-15 bpm higher in hypoxia with maximum heart rate slightly lower than normoxic max.

IMG_5541.JPG  IMG_5814.JPG  IMG_5812.JPG  IMG_5815.JPG 

 
Attached Files
pdf Bowtell et al 2013 repeated sprint hypoxia acute J Sci Med Sport.pdf (998.78 KB, 11 views)
pdf Galvin 2013 - Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.pdf (575.05 KB, 11 views)

sebo2000

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Posts: 227
 #9 

 

Hi Richard,

 

This is really dream setup! Thanks for sharing, this is amazing did you build this yourself?

 

I’m not arguing about the research, everyone has different goals and objectives, repeated sprint vs flying lap, endurance sprint vs peak power.

Running vs cycling, time to competition, what type of changes are we going after: systemic vs. functional.  

But most importantly starting point: everyone will have different starting point, different limiters and compensators. Person with cardiac limiter will need different recipe from person with muscular imbalance etc. Person with Type I muscle tissue will need different stimulus from Type II owner.

I also think sprint time and recovery has also huge influence how we recover PCr, so again specific recipe for specific goal. Saying 6 sec sprint with 30s recovery will make me faster might or might not be misleading it all depends, preload with Creatine might give one much better edge [smile]

 

Bottom line: Moxy will definitely help you see what is happening in your body, In the case of sprints I think looking at tHb trend might show more. Adding your altitude chamber to the arsenal will just give you more options for personalized training.

 

I think in the case of sprints we are using O2 from Myoglobin, and at the same time producing a lot of CO2, concentrating on removing excessive CO2 (exhaling) makes more sense than concentrating on getting more O2. Again it all depends of particular situation.

 

I managed to improve my top peak sprit power with Moxy in just 1.5 months by a lot, then I started hypoventilation training experiments and improved my sprint endurance comfort by also a lot. (A lot is relative here, for me it is a lot).

 

I was really thinking about buying one of those used altitude generators from ebay just to be able to play with it that is why I’m finding your post really interesting.

 

How this room works? Is it simulating lower pressure as well, is it sealed? Or removes O2 and adds what gas instead? Sorry for so many questions, I just admire the setup! 

Cheers,

Sebo

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